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Author Topic: Thoughts on tying.  (Read 8027 times)
bracken
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« on: February 05, 2014, 05:13:07 PM »

Here we are then. A new section for members to share thoughts and ideas with others.

Some of the flies tied by our members are absolutely superb if you are allowed to see them. Ric and Steve F. tie a range of really delightful buzzers, Tony B. also ties some beautiful quill buzzers. Some of the damsels Steve F. makes are extremely individual and really catch fish successfully. Andre has a wide selection of nicely tied flies and also makes damsel nymphs nothing like the commercial versions - his Barnoldswick nymph is a sight to behold too. On the now rare occasions that Russ joins us, look at the lovely tiny crunchers and buzzers that he makes between pulling pints and cleaning up after guests.

You don't have to have immaculate flies to catch trout - mine are mainly raggedy specimens, but seem to attract fish OK. The current Champion mainly ties a few very simple standard styles which work seriously well for him. It is nice however to have a box of well made flies and the satisfaction gained from catching fish on them is immense, (but not often admitted).

Why tie flies? About 50 odd years ago, I was fortunate enough to be allowed to fish for salmon on one of the decent beats of the Wye. Even then salmon flies were decidedly out of my fiscal range, so it made sense to scavenge fur and feathers and bits of ebroidery silk, then teach myself how to tie my own Usk grubs and stoats tails etc. Today even a simple fly costs a £1 or more, so the financial element still makes sense - (although I dread to think how much all the materials I now own have cost over this last many years). Today my reason for tying flies is often to try something different for my own curiosity - some work and others don't, some will work in some waters while other successful patterns will not. Experience of differing waters will lead me to take certain styles of fly there. Without exageration some of of us carry a couple of thousand flies in the tube arms - just in case - but in reality may only use a half a dozen on the day. I am greatly envious of those fishermen who can carry just one box of flies secure in the knowledge that they will be successful on the day. Others will select an 'on the day' box or two from their myriad of stocks in the boxes in the car. Only very rich people could go out and buy this number of commercially made flies, so the alternative is to make them yourself.

At the end of the day a quiet hour or two at the tying vice willl keep you out of the way of a nagging partner, so has to be a bonus! Just be careful not to get varnish drips on the carpet or maribou feathers offcuts all over the house, otherwise the time will be counter-productive if it's peace and quiet you wish for!

Sort the kit out and get tying!
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Lu1postie
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2014, 09:36:39 AM »

Hello Tony, I have a question for you and every body else out there. I had an idea for a fly recently and because I had not seen any at all on any fly shop or web site I decided to try tying it myself, but before I tell you what the fly is let me ask you how you would fish a bloodworm fly normally if you don't know the depth of water.
My idea came when I thought of this question.

So I decided to tie a buoyant bloodworm fly so I could fish it very much like a booby (you know how much I love fishing boobys). But instead of the trademark booby foam I used a thin strip of flat foam and bound that to the hook in red thread and then tying on the flexible red rubber legs things that you see on the flies like the app bloodworm, then used the bug bond over the complete fly to give it that buzzer look. I fished it at Dever springs in March and was pleasantly surprised at catching my first 6lb rainbow with it. I now fish it as a team of two flies on a leader of about 8' with a split shot on the point just to keep the two bloodworm patterns just off the bottom on a sinking line.
I have sent this same question as above to trout fisherman magazine this month so hopefully will get onto the letters page next month and just maybe I might have created a new fly for everyone.
Sorry about not coming to thornton this weekend, HOPE to see you all at either Ravensthorp or ringsted grange
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bracken
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« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2014, 08:01:01 AM »

Full marks for your innovative idea Andy. I am a little intrigued about the foam body with an epoxy coating though - does the weight of the epoxy not cancel the bouancy of the foam out. Have you tried dropping the fly into a bowl of water to see wahat happens?

Apps bloodworms are a very effective fly, Steve F. uses them and I have known him catch a lot of fish at Elinor in particular on them.

As I understand the lifestyle of these creatures, they tend to rise and fall in the water column rather like buzzers, so you need some method of varying the depth they are fished at. Oddly enough, I have noticed in this season particularly, that the depth the fly is fished has actually been critical for filling the bag. This was certainly true at Elinor, Wimbleball and yesterday at Thornton - a few inchess too high or too low and you wouldn't get the takes.

As a postman you have a woderful source of apps bloodworm legs. Arthur Cove invented a fly which was deadly, the legs were made of thin red rubber bands - with the secret of thinning the band down with a sharp raxor blade at the ends of the hook, to increase the mobility of the flailing legs.

I have noticed several flies now being sold with flat foam additions. Some blobs now incorporate a foam strip under the fritz and shaped into a forked tail to increase their buoancy. The American Bass fishermen produce some incredibly complex frogs and things using this material. It also makes good tails for Hawthorn flies at this time of year if held on a needle and tehn sgmented with fine black thread.

At the end of the day - if the fly works for you and you have faith in it use it!

I like tying up variations of 'flies' which I think may work. Sometimes they do, and often they don't and there may not be an obvious reason why. Occasionally they will work brilliantly on one day and then never again. The secret is to try and think through the reasons for the failure.
« Last Edit: May 11, 2014, 08:03:30 AM by bracken » Logged
Lupostie
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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2014, 10:13:42 AM »

Good morning Tony, I take it from your reply you've not tried the Bug bond method yet. It is a perfect apoxy glue replacement as it goes on in liquid for then you shine a UV light source onto it for about five seconds and it is then set hard. Plus you get that same buzzer type gloss to it. It does not seem to add much weight to the fly.
I have checked the buoyancy of each fly and depending on the size of the thin foam rubber strip used either makes the fly float nicely or makes it a neutral buoyancy where it sinks very slowly.
Yes I know the bloodworms rise and fall in the water but also tend  stay nearer to the bottom silt. This is why it's perfect for fishing on a sinking line and fairly lone leader because when you retrieve the line the fly sinks and when you stop it raises back up PLUS IT DOES NOT MATTER WHAT DEPTH OF WATER YOU'RE FISHING. Try it you may well find your catch rate increases and we all know you need that ha ha he he.
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Andy Ward
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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2014, 07:31:14 PM »

I'm intrigued Andy. Yes I have used bug bond, loon and also bug-off UV epoxy. They are pretty good if you use them out of direct sunlight, but as Dave says somewhere here, flies can be a little tacky on the surface occasionally for some peculiar reason. I must admit I would never have thought of using it to  produce neutral density flies - again full marks for innovation. Are the floaters a little bulky though?

As for getting fish - best not get me going on this subject. However, hooking them hasn't been the problem once I have worked out, or been told where they are and what they will take. Keeping them on the hook INTO the net has been a major problem though. It has been quite revealing that during the last two Comps when I reverted to using barbed hooks, my catch rate for fish in the bag dramatically improved, leading to a first and second place. People tell me that barbless hooks do not affect their catch rate - I can only state that something in my style definitely mitigates against their use in competitions. I'm prepared to believe that I netted about a third of the fish I would normally have had with barbed hooks. Catching them in the first place has remained about normal over many years - it has been about keeping them on.
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Lupostie
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« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2014, 08:34:15 AM »

Tony I tend to bind the thin foam with my strongest thread (kevlar) in red, it does slightly bulk the fly up but it is better than having booby eyes which would make it look stupid.I now need to make the body more smoother along the body of the fly
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Andy Ward
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